Green Allies for the Childbearing Year

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Midwifery Today, Issue 124, Winter 2017. Subscribe to Midwifery Today Magazine What herbs are safe to use during pregnancy? Some sources suggest avoiding all herbs in the prenatal period. Others claim that substances known to be harmful to fetuses and infants—such as essential oils—are safe and that the warnings about them should be ignored. Confusion is inevitable. Which herbs are safe to use during the prenatal period? When I was writing Wise Woman Herbal for the Childbearing Year 30 years ago, this question came up again and again. Everyone wanted a list of herbs to be avoided during pregnancy. As I tried to compile such a list, I found that drugs are far more dangerous than herbs—especially to the fetus. Sure, herbal laxatives like senna are not considered safe for pregnant women, but neither are laxatives from To access this post, you must purchase: Midwifery Today Website Membership – 12 months, Midwifery Today 1-year Subscription and Website Membership, Midwifery Today Website Membership Student Special – 12 months or Midwifery Today Website Membership – 6 months If you are already a member login here. Read More

Essential Oils for Prenatal Nausea and Digestion

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Midwifery Today, Issue 116, Winter 2015. Subscribe to Midwifery Today Magazine The use of essential oils for nausea and fatigue during labor is just the crowning head to an incredible body of possible uses throughout the childbearing year. Yet, starting with essential oil uses for digestion is a good idea for midwives and moms-to-be to begin to integrate this powerful natural health modality into practice. There are many digestive troubles during pregnancy, but nausea and vomiting are among the most common, affecting at least 50% of pregnant women. The cause, at least on a physiological level, is not well known, but may relate to blood sugar or hormonal levels. Cardamom and ginger, both in the plant family Zingiberaceae, contain HT3 antagonists called gingerols, which are thought to ease nausea by blocking serotonin receptors in the central nervous To access this post, you must purchase: Midwifery Today Website Membership – 12 months, Midwifery Today 1-year Subscription and Website Membership, Midwifery Today Website Membership Student Special – 12 months or Midwifery Today Website Membership – 6 months If you are already a member login here. Read More

Village Prenatals

Midwife Sister MorningStar shares the kind of community she is a part of and what prenatal care within their village philosophy looks like. Read More