Call the Midwife

Most of you probably read the trilogy Call the Midwife years ago. I am a little late, but I just finished all three books. The stories of people, mostly from the East End of London, seem more unreal than fiction, yet they are all true, according to the author, Jennifer Worth. She writes about the midwifery services, mostly homebirths, provided by the nuns at Nonnatus House for 99 years—from the 19th and through most of the 20th century.

Let’s Move Birth in the Right Direction

Complications are why we need midwives. If birth were completely normal all the time we midwives would not be needed—but, indeed, we are needed. It is so important that we all learn and gather the necessary skills and didactic and emotional knowledge we can before we take responsibility for a mother and baby. One of the great keys to a good birth outcome is knowing when and how to act and to do so quickly. Otherwise, we can keep hands off and be the quiet midwife in the corner—unobtrusive and loving. We need to be careful not to disturb the process.

More Evidence to Avoid Hospital Birth: A Critique of the Results of the ARRIVE Study

The protocol to induce for postdates at 41 weeks was accepted by medical professionals about 10 years ago. The randomized controlled trials (RCT) for this protocol are based on poor quality studies that included births at high risk of perinatal death, such as premature births and those of diabetics, and entail high rates of noncompliance with protocol (Cohain 2015). There is no good evidence that induction for postdates among low-risk women results in better outcomes for mother or baby.