First Hours after Birth

We’ve also all heard expressions of exhaustion and relief from the mother and seen a temporary lack of interest in her baby. The exclamations might sound more like these: “It’s over! I can’t believe it’s over!” “Can I just lie here for a minute?” “I can’t hold the baby right now. You take it.” ”Please just leave me alone right now.” “I’m so glad it’s over.” “We’re never doing this again!” Sometimes it takes a while before the mother can turn her attention from the intensity of the birth to her baby. To access this post, you must purchase: Midwifery Today Website Membership – 12 months, Midwifery Today 1-year Subscription and Website Membership or Midwifery Today Website Membership – 6 months If you are already a member login here. Read More

The Fourth Stage

The fourth stage of labor, the time after the baby has been born (second stage) and after the placenta is safely delivered (third stage) has been defined medically as one to two hours postpartum. Culturally, I define it as the first 42 days following childbirth. I believe the fourth stage never really ends, as a postpartum woman is forever transformed by the significant rite of passage of childbirth. Read More

How Being a Homebirth Midwife Enabled Me to Learn about SHOULDER DYSTOCIA

Back in 1970, if you wanted to be a midwife, there were very few options for training. There were two nurse-midwifery education programs then, but since I didn’t live in New York City or Jackson, Mississippi, I had no way of knowing about them. I just knew that I wanted to be a midwife. I was lucky to have the opportunity to witness the most gorgeous birth anyone could possibly have, and that birth launched my quest to become a midwife. To access this post, you must purchase: Midwifery Today Website Membership – 12 months, Midwifery Today 1-year Subscription and Website Membership or Midwifery Today Website Membership – 6 months If you are already a member login here. Read More

The Bond of Midwifery and Art

Midwifery Today’s graphic designer shares her thoughts on the importance of birth photography to the normalization of gentle birth around the world. Read More

A Slower Transition for Waterbirth Babies

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in Midwifery Today, Issue 117, Spring 2016. Subscribe to Midwifery Today Magazine Many people have noticed that some portion of waterborn babies seem a bit slow to come around. They aren’t stressed and they seem well-enough oxygenated, but still their transition to breathing air sometimes seems a little slower. They may be alert, have good tone and a strong heart rate (or maybe it is a bit slow as well) or sometimes they almost seem to be asleep, and they just don’t seem interested in breathing for a while. It is common for midwives to carefully watch that transition for a bit, about 15 to 30 seconds or so, and as long as all is improving, they wait and watch. Some midwives grab the kid and start working on him, stimulating him to start breathing since he seems To access this post, you must purchase: Midwifery Today Website Membership – 12 months, Midwifery Today 1-year Subscription and Website Membership or Midwifery Today Website Membership – 6 months If you are already a member login here. Read More

30 Years and Still Going Strong

Midwifery Today’s editor-in-chief celebrates MT’s 30-year anniversary by honoring 13 of the magazine’s most loyal contributors and gentle birth advocates. Read More

Delayed Cord Clamping Requires a New Table for Stressed Newborns

A female doctor with a shaven head and beautiful eyes stood between Lily’s legs, studying the monitor. We all heard the slow thudding. In an even tone, a Mary Poppins-like midwife said, “Get peds.” A pediatrician and a gaggle of pediatric residents entered the room as if they’d been standing at the door waiting for an invitation. The doctor picked up the vacuum and quietly announced that the time had come to use extra force. “The baby is so close,” she told us as she readied her equipment. To access this post, you must purchase: Midwifery Today Website Membership – 12 months, Midwifery Today 1-year Subscription and Website Membership or Midwifery Today Website Membership – 6 months If you are already a member login here. Read More