Galanthis, Alcmene’s Midwife: A Childbirth Myth of Ancient Greece and Rome

Almost everyone has heard of Hercules—famous for his strength—who performed 12 great labors and many other feats, including holding up the sky for Atlas and bringing Alcestis back from Hades (death) to her husband (life). Once there is a Disney-animated feature film about a hero like Hercules (Disney 1997), the hero’s name becomes familiar to many children and their parents worldwide. But few people know the name of Hercules’ mother, Alcmene, and even fewer know about Alcmene’s friend and midwife, Galanthis, who used her wits to defeat the goddess who was holding back the birth of Hercules.
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About Author: Jane Beal

Jane Beal, PhD, is a writer, educator, and midwife. She has served with homebirth practices in the Chicago, Denver, and San Francisco metro areas and in birth centers in the US, Uganda, and the Philippines. She is the author of Epiphany: Birth Poems, Transfiguration: A Midwife’s Birth Poems, and The Lives of Midwives from the Renaissance to the Enlightenment (in progress). She currently serves as the educational director for BirthWorks International and teaches at the University of La Verne in southern California. To learn more, please visit sanctuarypoet.net and christianmidwife.wordpress.com.

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