Tools for Easing Grief and Birth Trauma

Whether naturopathy, herbalism, homeopathy, counseling, or energy work—all are tools for to help birthworkers ease grief and birth trauma in their clients.

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Birth Behind Bars: The Difference Trauma-informed Doula Care Can Make

With mass incarceration in the US, we now have more women of childbearing age in prison than ever before. Lieser discusses the shortcomings of giving birth behind bars, and how doulas can help support these women to have a better birth.

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A Day in the Life

Reflections of a day in the life of a midwife in Jerusalem.

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Fatherhood Following the Experience of Child Sexual Abuse

With parenting in Sweden being more inclusive of fathers, this timely piece reports on a study of characteristics of fathers who had previously been sexually abused.

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There You See It, There You Don’t? Postpartum Depression

Women can suffer from postpartum depression for a variety of reasons. Using real stories and common sense, Wainer helps us get to the root of some of the causes and how birthworkers can help them.

Healing from a Homebirth Turned Cesarean

My first pregnancy was low risk. I planned a homebirth with a skilled midwife. As a labor and delivery nurse, I knew full well all my options. My husband and I felt that having the baby at home was the best choice for us. Labor started at exactly 40 weeks. I was fully dilated and effaced for well over 24 hours, but my sweet baby was persistently occiput posterior (OP) and not descending. Despite our best efforts, and tricks of the trade, he would not rotate/descend into my pelvis as he should have. We decided together, as a team, that transfer to the hospital was our only option as labor reached the 48 hour mark. Once I arrived at the hospital, an obstetrician I’ve worked with and trust implicitly tried to manually rotate my baby, to no avail. He was wedged firmly in my pelvis, still OP and asynclitic. So, off for a non-emergent but necessary cesarean we went. In the days, weeks, and months that followed, I was haunted. I felt such a deep, powerful, and magnetic love for my son, but a stabbing hole in my soul. I felt robbed and eventually angry, as I attempted to process

Supporting a Sexual Violence Survivor’s Journey to Motherhood: Caesarean and the Early Post-operation Stage

Some women may have deep trauma that requires accommodations within the hospital system to ensure that her care does not trigger the prior trauma. This article discusses how a hospital in Israel handled such a situation for a cesarean and provides a template for doing so.